This thread contains errata concerning incorrect or incomplete information in the A+ Exam Cram 220-901 & 220-902 (7th Edition), 1st printing. If you have any questions, please Contact Me.

A+ Exam Cram 220-901 & 220-902 (7th edition), 1st printing

Updated 4/21/2017- (Some E-books may already include these changes.)

(Errors are in red. Modifications are in blue. Additions are not color-coded. Page numbers refer to the print book. for e-books, refer to the Chapter and Section.)

Error: Cram Sheet, 220-901 section, #46, last bullet: There is a typo: Is should be written as Ls. That is the ls command in Linux which lists directories in the command-line interface

Error: Ch 2, Page 42: In Figure 2.6 there is an unidentified component on the bottom right hand side. It is the RAM slots.

Error: Ch 2, Page 72, Level 2 bullet, 2nd to last sentence: There is a typo: It should say i7-5820K, not i5-5820K.

Error: Ch 4, Page 99, Table 4.2: The module names for DDR4 changed since the writing of the book. In the first printing of the book, last column, it shows: PC4-17000, PC4-19200, PC4-21300, and PC4-25600. The correct module names for these are: PC4-2133, PC4-2400, PC4-2666, and PC4-3200. Essentially, the module names coincide with the standard names. For example, the standard DDR4-2133 uses the module name PC4-2133. This is a departure from the way previous DDR modules were named. However, the peak transfer rates listed in the table are correct, as is the rest of the information in the table.

Error: Ch 4, Page 109, #2, last sentence: The word "on" should be "in". I always suggest putting components inside an anti-static bag, not on top of.

Modification: Ch 6, Page 158, "Clean up the disk" bullet: The program Cleanup! is a bit outdated. At this point, CCleaner is a better, up-to-date option though there are others out there.

Error: Ch 7, Page 210: The answer to question #3 should be letter D, not C. However, the explanation is correct.

Clarification: Ch 7, Page 225 and 226: The section on mobile device connectivity requires some clarification. Tethering is when a mobile device shares its Internet connection with other computers. For example, a smartphone might have a 4G LTE connection and can share that data connection with other systems via Wi-Fi or USB. Wi-Fi tethering (otherwise known as a mobile hotspot) is when the mobile device creates a Wi-Fi network (hotspot) that other computers can connect to in order to share that mobile device's Internet connection. USB tethering is similar but the connecting computer is not required to have Wi-Fi capabilities. Instead, it connects via a USB cable. Either one of these must be configured on the mobile device as shown in the following figure:

Older mobile devices had the ability to share a PC or laptop's Internet connection via USB. This is known as Internet pass-through, but is less common on today's mobile devices.

My apologies for any confusion about these topics. This subject is re-visited in Chapter 18, page 620. That information is correct and should further help to clarify. If you have any additional questions about this or anything else in the book, feel free to contact me at this link.

Error: Ch 8, Page 252, Question 9: There is only one correct answer (Windows XP Mode). The question should not have asked for two answers. The explanation on page 253 is correct (other than the answer letters shown). Table 8.4 on page 241 is also correct.

Error: Ch 8, Page 252, Question 10: Answer D should be System Image Recovery. It is a correct answer and should be listed in the explanation as well.

Error: Ch 10, Page 325, Question 3: Answer D should read: "Click Start > All Programs > Windows Update; then click the Change Settings link. It should not say "Check for Updates link". The explanation on page 326 is correct.

Modification: Ch 15, Page 485, Table 15.1: Second row should state that Category 5 cable is suitable for 100 Mbps networks, and not 1 Gbps networks. This complies with the corresponding quiz question that follows the section. Some Internet sources may state that Cat 5 cable is suitable for 1 Gbps networks, but my tests prove otherwise. While you can use it to connect to devices that run at 1 Gbps (and though your operating system might actually show a 1 Gbps connection) it does not perform at 1 Gbps in the way that Cat 5e or Cat 6 would.

Error: Ch 18, Page 656, 2nd paragraph: FreeBSD shouldn't be included in this sentence as it is a Unix-like OS which is similar to Linux, but not under the Linux umbrella.

Addition: Ch 19, Page 677: An incident response plan (IRP) is the plan (or group of policies) that should be adhered to by first responders and incident response managers. An IRP might consist of 5 to 7 steps. Example 5 step plan: Identify, Investigate, Repair, Record the Response, and Adjust Procedure. Example 7-step plan: Preparation, Identification, Containment, Investigation, Eradication, Recovery, Follow-up. It can vary depending on the organization that you work for.

 

CompTIA objectives errata:

None as of the writing of this article.

                      
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